Archive for the ‘Public Parks’ Category

Princess Place Preserve

Posted: January 11, 2013 in Public Parks

Palm Coast, FL

In 1791, the King of Spain offered a 1,100 -acre land grant to Francisco Pellicer. Henry Mason Cutting purchased the property in 1886, renaming it Cherokee Grove. Featuring local materials including tabby block cladding, cedar and palm tree trunk post and pink coquina, the Adirondack camp-style lodge was constructed in 1887. The complex included servant;s quarters, a caretaker’s house, tennis courts, stables, bathhouse, poolhouse and the first in-ground concrete swimming pool in Florida. The Lodge became an entertainment center for many socially prominent American and New York families as well as European royalty. Cutting died in 1892, leaving a widow, Angela Mills Cutting and two small children. Angela later married an exiled Russian prince, Boris Scherbatoff, a member of the Russian royal family. Because he feared for his life, the Prince later changed the spelling to Scherbatow. After Prince Scherbatow died in 1949, the Princess useed the lodge as her primary residence. For this reason it became known as the Princess Estate. In 1954, Pricess Scherbatow sold the property to Lewis and Angela Wadsworth, one of the founding families of Flagler County. Flagler County purchased the property in 1993 as a preserve.

This beautiful 1,500-acre preserve situated in the northern part of Flagler County. The original lodge built by Henry Cutting stills stands as Flagler County’s oldest intact structure.

For more photos, go to:  http://lucididee.zenfolio.com/p870779354

===============================================

www.LucidideeFastBoats.com

Ormond Beach, FL

These ruins are the remains of a sugar and rum processing factory. The chimmney is about all that is left of the facility. A furnace or oven was used to heat the sugar cane juice. As the juice boiled, it was skimmed off by hand and placed in a cooler kettle and eventually as the impurities were eliminated, the resultant syrup was allowed to harden. It was then further processed into crystaline form and then to raw sugar. A lot of the juice remaining from the purification process was shipped to the Carribean and used in the rum industry.

Also, the furnace was used to create steam which ran conveyor belts and powered the machery that squeezed the juice out of the sugar cane.
These ruins were part of the Dummett Plantation, built circa 1825. It was destroyed by Indians during the Seminole War in 1836.

For more photos, go to: http://lucididee.zenfolio.com/p105775267

===============================================

www.LucidideeFastBoats.com

Bulow Plantation Ruins

Posted: January 11, 2013 in Public Parks

Flagler Beach, FL

Once a thriving sugar plantation, the Bulow Plantation Ruins include extensive coquina ruins of the sugar mill, several wells, a spring house, and the foundations of the once grand manor house, “Bulowville”, The plantation was begun in 1821 by Charles Bulow. In the 1830s his son operated the plantation along with 300 slaves. At the time, Bulow was considered the most prosperous plantation in East Florida. In December of 1835 the Seminole Indians, angry with the territorial governments policy of forcible Indian removal, attacked and destroyed sixteen plantations along the St. Johns and Halifax rivers. This marked the beginning of the Second Seminole War. Many of the refugees gathered at Bulow Plantation which was abandoned and ultimately destroyed in January of 1836.

For more photos, go to:  http://lucididee.zenfolio.com/p427007308

===============================================

www.LucidideeFastBoats.com